Competition Forearm Machine

$2,999.99
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ArmCompFore
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1 unit
Competition Forearm Machine

ArmWorks Forearm Machine is designed to work both the forearm and hand muscles. With proper movement and positioning the ArmWorks Forearm Machine allows for safe full range of motion. NanoWeights are a great addition to use with the Forearm Machines. ArmWorks Forearm Machine includes a complete set of weights calibrated for accuracy.

The competition machine is chrome. It has a green light that the judge/referee can light when a good lift has been completed. The competition machine has foot plates that competitors must use. Also included is the weight display cards. Olympic Calibrated Weights can be purchased separately: 45 lbs plate, 35 lbs plate, 25 lbs plate, 10 lbs plate, 5 lbs plate and 2.5 lbs plate. all the weights are exact weight (Calibrated)

Developing the Forearm using Nano Weights™

In 1997 I began working on developing a forearm machine that would work the forearm and hand in an anatomical movement, separating the wrist joint while moving the hand from a fully extended position to a fully flexed position. Once it was finished, in 1999, I started using the machine along with three friends. We all worked together in figuring out how often the forearm should be worked for the best results. One person’s workout was once a week. The other person’s workout was twice a week. My workout was three times a week. We all used the same weight increase per week, which was a 10 oz. plate mate 5/8 of a pound. So at my third workout I would add 10 oz. = 5/8 lb. After a year of using the machine three times per week I had by far the best results with the least amount of failures.

In 2000 I started using the Nano Weight™ System, which was small increases for weight gains. My workouts for my forearms and other parts of my body were all the same. My forearm workout consisted of starting with one warm-up set of 10 reps. with 20 lbs. The second warm-up set was 6 reps. with 30 lbs. The next set started the workout: 3 sets of 4 reps. with 40 lbs. After this, I added 2-1/2 lbs. for one set of 3 reps., then I added 2-1/2 lbs. for one set of 2 reps. For the last set of the workout I added 2-1/2 lbs. for 1 rep. After this we warmed down with 10 reps. at 30 lbs. The reason I chose this workout was to tax the body with the heavy weight. The most important factor is keeping perfect form while really working with eccentric movement. I have become more aware in 2010 and 2011 how very, very important eccentric movement is. During the first year I was taking 2 ounce increases until I was fighting to keep good form. The second year, which was 2003, I dropped to 1 ounce increases. In 2004 I had to drop my increases to ½ ounce to order to maintain good form. Now you have to remember: no failure. In 2005 I then had to drop the increase to ¼ ounce. For four years I stayed at ¼ ounce increases. In 2009 I developed the building blocks and added them to my workouts. After one year using the building blocks, my increases in the forearms went up 200 percent. The reason is that the building blocks were increasing the strength, not in my hand and forearms, but in my fingers. By 2011, as a result of developing the strength in my fingers my forearm increases were up 400 percent. I am now back at 2 ounce increases per workout. This is a great system for the mind and the body. Every day is a great day.


ARMWORKS WORKOUT SYSTEM FOR THE FOREARMS AND FOR THE HANDS

Working with the forearm and the hand for the last eleven years, I have developed a system in which the forearm and hand muscle groups build like you will not believe. Before I tell you about the Armworks Weight System, let me tell you about the research I have done with the forearms and the hands. For a period of two years we did a study with four different workouts for the hands and the forearms. These are the results:

  • 1) For six months we tried working the forearms and hands five days per week, with small weight increases. After six months the increases were down by 1/3 and the control of the movement did not feel positive.
  • 2) For six months we worked out one day on and two days off, with small weight increases. The result was not good. The movement became unnatural and felt very uncontrollable.
  • 3) We tried doing the workout once a week, allowing for a lot of rest to the muscles. This was not good. After a period of two months the weight became very heavy and the form was being lost.
  • 4) The workout we found to be the best through research was working out on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with no forearm workouts on Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday or Sunday. The hardest workout day has been on Monday, with Friday being the easiest day. Constant gains are being met. Even after a period of eleven years, with the use of the Nano Weight system, the increases are still being met without failure or injury to the tendons or the muscle. This is very positive.

ARMWORKS WEIGHT SYSTEM

Now let’s talk about the ARMWORKS™ system. This system was developed with not only the muscles in mind, but more importantly, with the tendons and ligaments in mind. Tendons grow three times slower than muscles. Ligaments strengthen slowly also. It is very important to build them equally strong. You will accomplish this with the ARMWORKS system. Now let’s start from the beginning.

  • 1) The first step is to learn proper form. You start with a very light weight while learning the correct form and getting used to the machine. You need correct form not only in your hand movement but also in the positioning of your body.
  • 2) Once you are secure with your form you will start your weight increases. This is where the NanoWeight system will be used. You will increase 5 oz. per workout. Remember, it is very important that you start out with a very easy weight. When the workouts become continuously hard ... but before you fail ... you will drop your weight increases to 3 oz. per workout. When this workout becomes continuously hard ... but before you fail ... you will drop your weight increases to 2 oz. per workout. This system is building your tendons, ligaments and muscles together. With the Nano Weight system the weight increases can be as small as ¼ oz. This allows for constant gains without failure to the mind or injury to the muscle.
  • KEY:
    Failure = unable to complete full range of motion

Injury = damage to soft tissue, ligaments, tendons, or muscles

REHABILITATION USING THE ARMWORKS MACHINE

A very important factor in rehabilitation is that the ligaments heal and rebuild much slower than the tendons. The tendons rebuild much slower than the muscles. When we are talking about rebuilding damaged ligaments, tendons, and muscles we have to use very small weight increases. When you are rebuilding damaged tissue you need two main goals. Your first goal is to rebuild damaged tissue 100% in strength. Your second goal is to regain full range of motion with the damaged tissue. Now let’s talk about the Armworks machine and how it can help you to accomplish these two goals.

The Armworks machine has an adjustment on the center pulley that allows for very small increases in the angle from the position where you first start. The angle can be adjusted with an easy turn of a nut. In theory, when working with damaged tissue, you should start with an angle of 2 degrees off center. As soon as the damaged tissue starts rebuilding itself, growing in strength, and regaining range of motion, you would increase the angle from 2 degrees to 8 degrees. As the damaged tissue starts rebuilding, not only in strength but also in range of motion, it would again be time to increase the degree of the angle. You would also continue working in this manner, increasing the degree of the angle as the range of motion begins increasing. Again, your second goal is to regain full range of motion in the damaged tissue.

The Armworks machine can also be ordered with a spring resistant system. This spring system has four levels of resistance. I feel that the spring system is very good for stimulating growth and increasing range of motion in damaged tissue. Continued growth and range of motion can be achieved with the addition of the use of the Nano Weight system. Working with the Nano Weight system we can start with very small weight increases to rebuild and strengthen the damaged tissue. The first weight increase could be as small as ¼ ounce. As the damaged tissue rebuilds itself and gets stronger, the weight will become easier. It would now be time to increase the weight to continue to stimulate growth in the damaged tissue. Our increase would now change from ¼ ounce to ½ ounce. As the damaged tissue rebuilds itself and grows in strength, small increment adjustments in the weight increases will be made until the perfect weight increase is found. The perfect weight increase is where the damaged tissue can rebuild and strengthen itself while the weight training exercise remains easy, the most important factor being that we do not have to worry about reinjuring the damaged tissue. We will continue with the weight increasing until the tissue is fully repaired, until there is full range of motion, and until the strength is 100% equal on both sides of the body. The Nano Weight system can make achieving all of this possible. The Nano Weight system can help in rebuilding damaged tissue 100%.

KEY:
Injury = damage to soft tissue, ligaments, tendons, or muscle.

BRACHIORADIALIS

(upward movement)

1) This is one of the larger forearm muscles. The Brachioradialis muscle is put into full use when the bicep is in a fixed position. The Armworks machine sets your bicep in the right position so this muscle will work to its fullest. The Brachioradialis muscle also acts as a semipronator and a semisupinator. This means that it is one of the only forearm muscles which stabilizes the forearm in the upward movement both clockwise and counterclockwise. This muscle and tendon run from your elbow to the end of your forearm bone

EXTENSOR CARPI RADIALIS BREVIS

(downward movement)

2) The Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis is not a very large muscle. This muscle is an extensor muscle, which means that it is used in lowering the weight from the top to the bottom. It is one of the muscles which also works the wrist. This muscle also abducts the hand, or holds the hand in an inward position. This is very important in keeping the movement anatomically correct. This muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the third finger.

EXTENSOR CARPI RADIALIS LONGUS

(downward movement)

3) This muscle is used in letting the weight down. It works from the top coming down to the bottom. This muscle also controls both the wrist and the hand during the downward movement. It locks the hand and the wrist in a correct anatomical position while they move together. This muscle and tendon run from the elbow to your second finger.

FLEXOR CARPI ULNARIS

(upward movement)

4) The Flexor Carpi Ulnaris muscle is used in controlling the wrist. The wrist has two ways in which it moves that this muscle controls. It controls the wrist while moving in a flexed motion and also in a sideways motion inward toward the body. This muscle also controls the movement of flexing the forearm. These are all upward movements. The Flexor Carpi Ulnaris muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the beginning of the little finger.

FLEXOR DIGITORUM SUPERFICIAL

(upward movement)

5) The Flexor Digitorum Superficial is a very large muscle. This muscle works the hand, wrist, and forearm all in the upward movement. This is a very important muscle that has a lot to do with control. The muscle flexes the hand and the wrist to assist with flexing the forearm. The muscle and tendon run from the elbow to your fingers.

FLEXOR POLLICIS LONGUS

(upward movement)

6) The Flexor Pollicis Longus is a very important muscle because it has a lot to do with developing a strong grip. This is a flexor muscle. It works in pulling the weight up. This muscle and tendon run from one inch from your elbow to the end of your thumb.

FLEXOR DIGITORUM PROFUNDUS

(upward movement)

7) The Flexor Digitorum Profundus muscle works in flexing the hand and the wrist. This muscle controls the four fingers, which is very important in developing a strong grip as well as in developing a controlled movement. The muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the end of the four fingers.

PALMARIS LONGUS

(upward movement)

8) The Palmaris Longus muscle works with flexing the wrist and also with turning and flexing the forearm. Its main function is with flexing the wrist. It only assists in turning and flexing the forearm. This muscle is used in upward movement. The Palmaris Longus muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the wrist.

FLEXOR CARPI RADIALIS

(upward movement)

9) The Flexor Carpi Radialis muscle has many functions. It works in flexing the wrist and also in controlling two movements in the hand. The two hand movements that it works with are turning the hand counterclockwise and turning the hand outward. It only assists in the flexing of the wrist. This muscle is only used in the upward movement. The Flexor Carpi Radialis muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the wrist.

PRONATOR TERES

(upward movement)

10) The Pronator Teres is a very small and short muscle. Its main use is in pronation of the forearm. This means to move the forearm in a counterclockwise motion. It is also used in flexing the forearm. This muscle is used in upward movement. The Pronator Teres muscle and tendon start at the elbow and go to the center of the forearm

PRONATOR QUADRATUS

(downward movement)

11) The Pronator Quadratus is a very small muscle. This muscle has one function, which is to pronate the forearm. This muscle is lightly used in a downward movement, helping to keep the forearm stationary. The Pronator Quadratus muscle is 2 to 3 inches in length. It is located ½ inch above the wrist and runs up the forearm.

EXTENSOR CARPI ULNARIS

(downward movement)

12) The Extensor Carpi Ulnaris has two functions. They are the extension of the wrist and the abduction of the hand. Thus muscle is worked with the downward movement from the top to the bottom. This muscle works with controlling the wrist and locking the hand into a strong controlling movement. The Extensor Carpi Ulnaris muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the fifth finger.

ANCONEUS

13) The Anconeus is a very small muscle. Its only function is to assist the tricep in extending the forearm. This muscle runs from the elbow for 2 inches and stops. It does not help with upward or downward movement.

EXTENSOR DIGITORUM

(downward movement)

14) The main function of the Extensor Digitorum muscle is the extension of the four fingers. This muscle also works to assist in the extension of the wrist. It works in a downward movement, from top to bottom, to develop a strong grip. The Extensor Digitorum muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the end of the four fingers.

EXTENSOR DIGITI MINIMI

(downward movement)

15) The function of the Extensor Digiti Minimi muscle is to move the small finger in the downward movement. It is a very small muscle, however extremely important for balance. This muscle and tendon run from the middle of the forearm to the end of the little finger.

EXTENSOR POLLICIS BREVIS

(downward movement)

16) The Extensor Pollicis Brevis is a very small muscle which works in the extension of the thumb. It also works with moving the thumb inward. This muscle is used in a downward movement. The Extensor Pollicis Brevis muscle and tendon run from the middle of the forearm to the middle of the thumb.

EXTENSOR POLLICIS LONGUS

(downward movement)

17) The Extensor Pollicis Longus is a small muscle which works with the extension of the thumb. This muscle is worked very hard in the downward movement from top to bottom. It also works to help with the grip. The Extensor Pollicis Longus muscle and tendon run from a little more than halfway up the forearm to the end of the thumb.

SUPINATOR

(upward & downward movement)

18) The Supinator muscle has one function, which is to supinate the forearm, or to move the forearm in a clockwise motion. This function of this muscle is used in both upward and downward movement. The Supinator muscle and tendon run from the elbow to the middle of the forearm

ABDUCTOR POLLICIS LONGUS

(upward & downward movement)

19) The Abductor Pollicis Longus is a very small muscle that has two functions. Its functions are to abduct the thumb and the wrist. This means to turn both the thumb and the wrist outward away from the body. This muscle is worked in upward and downward movement. This is a very important muscle because it locks the thumb and the wrist in a correct anatomical position. The Abductor Pollicis Longus muscle and tendon run from 2/3 of the way up the forearm to the base of the thumb.

EXTENSOR INDICIS

(downward position)

20) The Extensor Indicis is a small muscle which controls the index finger. It works in the downward movement. This muscle also works in balancing out the grip. The Extensor Indicis muscle and tendon run from the base of the forearm to the second bone in the index finger.

ABDUCTOR POLLICIS BREVIS

(upward & downward movement)

21) The Abductor Pollicis Brevis muscle abducts the thumb and draws the thumb toward the angle of the palm. This is a very important muscle to work. It will give you a very strong grip. It is important to build the thumb muscles so you can lock in your grip without worry of loosening it. This muscle is worked in both upward and downward movement. The Abductor Pollicis Brevis muscle and tendon run from the wrist to the middle of your thumb.

THEORY

The theory behind the Nano Weight System is to control the weight increase so that the body is able to grow in strength and size without failure or injury. The Nano Weight System is only effective if the weight training exercises are being performed with proper form and with a controlled movement. The Nano Weight System is NOT effective with improper form or with cheating movements.

Through years of research we have discovered that the large muscle groups, such as the legs and back, etc., are able to handle three to five ounce weight increases per workout consistently without failure or injury. The smaller muscle groups, such as the forearm, hand, and triceps, etc., are able to handle one-half to one ounce increases per workout consistently without failure or injury

In summary, we have learned that by using the Nano Weight System, along with proper form and a controlled movement, the muscles and tendons are able to grow in size and strength consistently without failure or injury. This is what makes the Nano Weight System positive for the body and for the mind.

KEY:
Failure = unable to complete full range of motion
Injury = damage to soft tissue, ligaments, tendons, or muscles 

THEORY BEHIND THE NANO WEIGHT SYSTEM

  • 1) The most important point of this weight system is to control the weight increases, so the body is able to go up in size and strength without failure or injury. This system is only effective if the weight lifting exercise is being performed with proper form and with controlled movement. This system will not apply to any weight lifting exercises being done with improper form, or with a cheating movement. With this system, as the weight you are using gets heavier, even if the weight increases remain the same, the percentage that you are increasing drops slightly every workout. For example, if I am working out on the bench press with 350 pounds and taking 5 oz. increases, I am increasing 0.09% for the first workout only. This percentage changes slightly with each workout, as the weight gets heavier
  • 2) One year later, working out 2x per week with no misses, my gain for the year would be 32.5 pounds. My workout weight would now be 382.5 pounds. With 5 oz. weight increases per workout, my increases drop from 0.09% to 0.08%. By the third year my workout weight would be up to 414 pounds and my increases would drop from 0.08% to 0.075%.
  • 3) Using this system allows us to accomplish finding the weight increases that the muscle will be able to handle consistently without failure or injury. This is possible because as you use more weight the muscle increases in size and strength. At the same time you are increasing in weight you are also decreasing in the percentage of increases that you are taking in comparison to the amount of weight being used.
  •  4) When muscle gets to its maximum size for the amount of blood that it gets, your body will actually produce more blood vessels in that muscle. This is called Angiogenesis. This takes place when the body feels that the muscle is to the point where it needs more blood flow to feed and rebuild the muscle that has grown in size.
  • 5) Through years of research, this system was designed to work with the body to accomplish maximum performance from a muscle group without failure or injury. Through the years of research, we have discovered that the large muscle groups, such as the leg and back, etc., are able to have between 3 oz. and 5 oz. gains consistently without failure or injury. The smaller muscle groups, such as the forearm, hand, and triceps, etc., are only able to handle small gains of between ½ oz. to 1 oz. per workout. In summary, we learned that by using this weight system along with having proper form and movement in the weight lifting exercises, the muscles could grow in strength and size consistently without failure or injury. This makes this system unique for the body and the mind.
  • KEY:
    Failure = unable to complete full range of motion
    Injury = damage to soft tissue, ligaments, tendons, or muscles. 

EXERCISE

Physically active people have a life expectancy which is, on average, seven years longer than sedentary people. There is less depression, less anxiety, better mental efficiency, higher self-esteem, more restful sleep, more relaxation, spontaneity, enthusiasm, and better self-acceptance. In the 1960s, Dr. Ralph Paffenbarger began tracking 17,000 Harvard alumni. His 1986 landmark study showed that death rates fell in proportion to the number of calories burned each week. A few years later, Paffenbarger and colleagues studied a large group of men and women, measuring their physical fitness by a maximal treadmill exercise test. Follow-up at eight years showed that mortality rates from all causes (including heart disease and cancer) fell dramatically across the board the more fit the participants were. Follow-up ten years later confirmed that those who maintained or improved physical fitness were less likely to die from all causes than persistently unfit men.

Simply walking can be an effective way of strengthening the mind as well as the heart for elderly people. Improved memory, planning, and scheduling were seen in one study. Loss of skeletal muscle mass (sacropenia), increase in body fat, and decreases in strength, basal metabolic rate, and activity level are all associated with aging. But research shows that changes in body composition and aerobic capacity are related to the number of hours of exercise per week and energy spent in daily activities. High-intensity strength or resistance training resulted in increases in muscle strength up to 227% and increases in muscle mass up to 11.4% in men aged 60 to 72. Similar training in frail elderly (87 to 93 years of age) resulted in a 189% increase in muscle strength and 11% increase in muscle size in eight weeks. Similar programs resulted in increased gait speed, increased stair-climbing power and balance, and more spontaneous activity levels. “The implications of muscle mass and strength maintenance and its effect in enhancing energy requirements has important impact on the quality of life in the elderly.”€ The capacity to adapt to increased levels of physical activity is preserved even in the ”oldest old” 

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